The message Meghan's bridal gown is sending to the world

The politics of the Duchess of Sussex's Givenchy Haute Couture gown
Share
Share
The message Meghan's bridal gown is sending to the world

Meghan’s style has become progressively more monochromatic and minimalistic throughout the royal engagement, so it shouldn’t have come a surprise that her Givenchy Haute Couture bridal gown – with its graphic open bateau neckline and six artfully placed seams – was startling in its simplicity.

Already a household name and a Stateside superstar, the fact that she’s perfectly capable of carrying off the most flamboyant of frocks yet chose not to was perhaps her way of telling the world: “This is not a fashion moment.” Instead it was a moment to celebrate unity, embrace diversity, and usher in a new era of modernity for the British monarchy.

In Givenchy’s first female Artistic Director Clare Waight Keller, a British designer at a Parisian Haute Couture house, Meghan has found something of a kindred spirit – a strong woman making a career for herself in an adopted homeland, with the weight of history on her shoulders, regardless of the neckline, who is also content to let her work speak for itself.

As such, the flowers of all 53 countries of the Commonwealth were delicately embroidered on her five-metre-long veil, indicating Meghan wanted to be seen in her new role, rather than that of Rachel Zane in Suits. The only reference to her former career came in the form of similarities to Audrey Hepburn’s wedding gown in the 1957 film Funny Face, fitted on set by Monsieur Hubert de Givenchy himself.

That was until she changed into her slinky Stella McCartney, Bond-girl gown for the evening reception – another victory for talented British female designers – accessorised with an electric-powered E-Type Jag, symbolically vintage made modern, as the new royal couple zoomed off into a new era.

Photo: Courtesy of Givenchy