What The Middle East's Brightest Minds Are Reading Now: Ghizlan Guenez

The founder and CEO of The Modist gives Grazia a peek inside her library
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What The Middle East's Brightest Minds Are Reading Now: Ghizlan Guenez

Algerian-born and Middle East-based Ghizlan Guenez launched The Modist, a global e-commerce fashion platform that celebrates diversity and empowered choice, in 2017.

Ghizlan is an avid supporter of the regional woman, her style choices, and the designers who champion them. She herself is also celebrated internationally for her entrepreneurial spirit and elevated sense of style.

The Hard Thing About Hard Things by Ben Horowitz is a mustread for every entrepreneur, CEO and anyone running a business. It showcases that even (and especially), the most successful leaders go through the hardest times to reach their success, and tells the story of Ben Horowitz, the head of one of the leading investment firms in the world, and how he overcame the toughest times in his journey.

And then there is The 5AM Club by Robin Sharma, a book that changed my life. It’s an incredibly powerful read to help people take control of their lives and achieve their dreams through practical advice and tips on building the right routine to  enable you to do that. Whether you are an entrepreneur, artist, or a mother, this book will come in handy.

Bad Blood by John Carreyrou is a page-turner about an incredible success story in Silicon Valley and how it all unfolded (but I won’t ruin it for you…).

Grit by Angela Duckworth was definitely an influence for me. This is a book that simply says that no matter how smart or brilliant one is, they will always be outweighed in life by someone who is extremely hard working, persistent and has tenacity. Grit is the secret sauce of those who win. It’s about falling nine times and getting up ten.

Next on my reading list is Everything Is Figureoutable by Marie Forleo. The title says it all. I’m all about being constructive, optimistic and knowing that with positivity and perseverance almost everything can be resolved, so this book is right up my alley. I’m curious to see how it will reinforce that mindset for me.

I’m also looking out for Work Like a Woman by Mary Portas and How Women Rise by Marshall Goldsmith and Sally Helgesen. The latter is about the habits that hold women back. Whereas men by nature are far more aggressive and will go after the goal, even if they were only 50 per cent there. I’ve always known that as women, we are perfectionists and oftentimes we create our own barriers for growth by waiting too long to be ready before we ask for the raise, the promotion, apply for a leadership position or even decide to have a child! This book will be handy to understand the psyche of women in that respect.