Could your shoes be carrying coronavirus?

Studies show that COVID-19 could travel on shoes

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Could your shoes be carrying coronavirus?

A gentle reminder from Grazia about footwear hygiene - pandemic or not: you should probably keep your shoes off the breakfast table

The CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - a United States federal agency under the Department of Health and Human Services) shared that a small study was conducted at a hospital in Wuhan, China where they discovered that the novel coronavirus could transfer from the floors and onto the soles of your shoes.

“From 19 February 2020 through 2 March 2020, we collected swab samples from potentially contaminated objects in the Intensive Care Unit and General Ward...The rate of positivity was relatively high for floor swab samples, perhaps because of gravity and air flow causing most virus droplets to float to the ground. In addition, as medical staff walk around the ward, the virus can be tracked all over the floor, as indicated by the 100 per cent rate of positivity from the floor in the pharmacy, where there were no patients,” said the authors of the Aerosol and Surface Distribution of Coronavirus in their recent study.



The public, and especially medical healthcare workers in the frontline are urged to disinfect their shoes regularly during this time. “We highly recommend that persons disinfect shoe soles before walking out of wards containing COVID-19 patients,” the study states.



Additionally, previous learnings have suggested that coronavirus may persist in the air, paper and tissue for up to three hours, on copper for up to four hours, on cardboard up to 24 hours, on cloth for 48 hours and on plastic and stainless steel for up to 72 hours. However, the World Health Organisation and the CDC declared that it is not enitrely certain how long the virus survives on surfaces as the results may vary under different environmental conditions and surrounding temperatures.

The CDC advised that you may use surface and fabric disinfectant sprays (with a compostion of 70 per cent alcohol) for your shoes and other suspected surfaces.

Disinfecting all our footwear now. BRB.

Photo: Supplied