How going into hibernation might be the key to human survival

Stranger than science-fiction
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How going into hibernation might be the key to human survival

If you think hibernating during the winter months is for bears only, think again, because doctors at the University of Maryland Medical Centre in Baltimore are researching how human hibernation could be the key to keeping patients alive.

Having successfully placed a patient into “suspended animation” to keep them alive, Professor Tisherman has revealed to New Scientist magazine that the hospital is experimenting with the concept of hibernation.

While no details about the identity of the patient have been released, sources say they arrived with a stopped heart, having lost at least half their blood.

And in order to save the patient’s life, surgeons placed the patient in hibernation, by chilling their body temperature to between 10-15 degrees Celsius, and replacing their blood with an ice-cold saline solution so they could work on his organs and successfully repair the damage to his body. 

A normal human temperature is usually around 37 degrees.

Italian physicist Professor Marco Durante, one of the world’s leading radiotherapy experts, has also alluded to hibernation being used in future cancer treatments. "You wake up the patients and they are cured. That is our ambition," he said.

Photos: Supplied