How Oman could help save the planet

Who knew the country rocked so much?
Share
Share
How Oman could help save the planet

We have to admit, when visiting Oman by boat to watch dolphins swim in the crystal-blue waters, we didn't think of the vast amount of rocks around us as much more than just an attractive backdrop for our Instagram photo. So far, so basic.

But these rocks are more than just scenery. Some of them are hard at work, naturally reacting with carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and turning it into stone. Scientists say that if this natural process - called carbon mineralisation - could be harnessed, accelerated and applied on a huge scale, it could help fight climate change.

Put simply, this is because rocks could remove some of the billions of tonnes of heat-trapping carbon dioxide that humans have pumped into the air since the beginning of the Industrial Age.

Dr Peter Kelemen, a geologist at Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory adds that if it was somehow possible to fully utilise Oman’s rocks, they could store hundreds of years of CO2 emissions (current yearly worldwide emissions are close to 40 billion tonnes.)

While there's clearly a long way to go, the fact that an idea to help our planet's future has formed really rocks. (Sorry). 

Photos: iStock