Prêt-à-Polynesia: How DXB's favourite brand took over NYFW

What rainclouds? Ayah Tabari brings a much-needed splash of sunshine to New York Fashion Week with Mochi's latest sartorial adventure
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Prêt-à-Polynesia: How DXB's favourite brand took over NYFW

True story: one of our favourite fashion reveals of the season is discovering which dreamy destination Ayah Tabari’s going to transport us to next. So far the Mochi adventure has taken us to Palestine, Jaipur, Hungary, Morocco, Spain, India, Budapest, Uzbekistan, Africa, and most recently Mexico, and Spring/Summer 2019 sees the fash pack setting sail for Polynesia. Ayah reveals, “The different artisanal practices I saw on my trip to the Polynesian islands were inspiring and really taught me about their community.”


She continues, “For this collection, we included tiaré - A Tahitian flower – to emphasize the strong, bond between the Polynesians and nature. In addition, the embroidery includes tattoos, known as tatau, in which each line drawn gives an essence of meaning and life to the body. Tie-dye print is also incorporated to show the unique Tahitian technique of handmade artwork, created with colours that express the vibrant culture of Polynesia. We wanted to capture that authenticity, so by developing these prints I believe we brought their beautiful traditions to life.”


And Mochi devotees will be relieved to know that the cult hit sell-out rainbow Isabella dress returns in an all-new, reimagined, frill-sleeved guise for SS19, for those who missed the boat the first time around.


Diving deeper into her influences for SS19, she tells Grazia, “A major part in the inspiration for this collection was the ocean. While travelling the Polynesian islands, I really felt and learnt about how much the people of these towns love to be by the water. The artisans are inspired by the sea – its sounds, its movement and its colour. This is why I’ve used a lot of blue in the silhouettes, as well as making sure I used shells in the presentation. These actually came from my trip, so I felt I had the artisans’ presence with me.”

Photos: Supplied